Salukis facts

By EVOest Staff 0 comments

One of the oldest of dog breeds, Salukis were once considered a gift from Allah. They’re fast as the wind, skinny as a supermodel, and quietly devoted to their people. A Saluki is easy to groom, challenging to train, and not to be trusted off leash. 
The Saluki's origins are shrouded in the sands of time, but his history is believed to go back to antiquity. He is the very definition of grace and speed, well deserving of the name bestowed on him by his Arab breeders — The Noble.
The Saluki is bred for speed, strength, and endurance, qualities that are evident in his long, narrow head and sleek yet muscular body. 
This breed has a wide range of equally acceptable types, reflecting the wide area over which it was developed.
The Saluki tends to be aloof and reserved with strangers. It is extremely devoted to its own family, but it is not particularly demonstrative. 
The Saluki is very gentle with children, but it may not be playful enough to satisfy most of them. Extremely sensitive, it does not take to rough-and-tumble play or deal well with harsh corrections. Some Salukis can be shy. This breed is very quiet and sedate indoors, seeking out a soft, warm spot. Outside, it runs in great circles at tremendous speeds and will chase any small running animals or fast-moving objects. It may not come when called.
Unless he's protected by a strong human on the other end of the leash or a securely fenced yard, he's likely to meet his end beneath the wheels of a car. You might think that Salukis living in the country would have fewer issues, but they've been known to chase down and tangle with or kill goats, otters, foxes, raccoons, snakes, squirrels, and deer. 
The Saluki, also called the Gazelle Hound, Arabian Hound, or Persian Greyhound, is native to the area from eastern Turkestan to Turkey.
It is believed to be closely related to the Afghan Hound, which is another ancient breed. The Saluki is the royal dog of Egypt, and perhaps one of the oldest domesticated dogs known to man. It was named after the Arabian city "Saluki" in the Middle East, which no longer exists today. Their bodies were often found mummified alongside the bodies of the Pharaohs themselves, and their pictures appear in ancient Egyptian tombs dating from 2100 BC. 

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